COMPLETE YOUR RESUME FROM TOP TO BOTTOM!

ResumeCarrington College California students have the help of experienced Career Services teams to help them build striking résumés, but when building yours, consider an interesting fact we read recently about Google’s hiring policy, and their changing attitude towards résumés.

In the introduction to the book ‘The Rare Find: How Great Talent Stands Out‘ by George Anders, the author explains how Google had been looking at candidate résumés far too narrowly in the past. They had been concentrating on the information at the top – experience, education, GPA – but ignoring the valuable personal insight usually tucked away at the bottom.

The thinking was that high-IQ people was what Google needed, but some insiders worried that they might be rejecting “a lot of talented people whose true abilities surpassed their academic credentials.”

We know that most of you probably won’t be applying for positions with Google, but nonetheless it’s interesting to understand the views of an HR department that receives an average of 75,000 résumés a week.

The HR professional highlighted in the introduction to the book was the first person at Google to start reviewing résumés ‘upside down’ as the author called it. He would look at the candidate bios first to find out what makes the candidate the person they are, before scrolling back up to look at the more traditional aspects such as education, experience and qualifications.

Our faculty and staff often talk about the need for you to expand your scope – to make good decisions that will help broaden your appeal to prospective employers. You may not think it as important as your work history, education or experience, but many employers are now looking at other ‘credentials’ or achievements to paint a complete picture of you.

When a company is hiring, it doesn’t matter if they are the size of a ‘Google’, or a local doctor’s office or dental practice, the recruiter wants to make sure they hire the best person for the job. And that doesn’t always mean the candidate with the best qualification or score. Being a book genius does not necessarily make you right for a job; especially in a ‘people business’ like health care.

So make sure your résumé includes things like volunteering, or your personal achievements. Perhaps you’re a marathon runner? That shows commitment. Did you run a thriving lemonade stand as a child? That demonstrates drive and ingenuity. Did you work 30 hours a week while going through school. That shows determination and a hunger for success.

Above all, when it comes to developing your résumé, work closely with the Career Services Department at your campus. Their expertise can help you craft a polished résumé that shines from top to bottom.

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