HOW TO HANDLE THE STRESS OF SCHOOL AND WORK

Going to school is stressful by itself, adding in the real world makes it even harder.

If you’re one of the millions of college students who has to work while going to school you know it isn’t easy, and sometimes it might feel like the stress of work and school is just too much!

Adding in the stress of life itself, juggling kids on top of work and school can seem impossible. It’s important for students to find a way to cope so they can be successful in the real world and in the classroom.

According to a U.S. Census report, over 70 percent of college students work and go to school. That means most students have to worry about more than just their classes. It’s not the end of the world, but some students might find the stress of dealing with both can feel overwhelming. Here are some ways to handle it when you feel like you have too much on your plate.

Rethink How You’re Managing Your Time

Do you sometimes feel like you’re drowning in work, whether it’s from your employer or your instructor? Having a hard time balancing your kids’ schedule with yours? If you’re not using a planner or calendar yet, you should be. When you have a bunch of things to remember every day, tools like these can help. It might seem weird to spend precious time on finding the best way to organize and manage your day, but in the end it’ll save you time, and help reduce your stress.

You can always go old school and use a notebook planner, but some people like to use Google Calendar or task management software like Todoist. These tools send you notifications and reminders when something is due. They also sync your computer and phone, so you can access your to-do list anytime, anywhere.

Stay Healthy and Get Plenty of Sleep 

If you don’t focus on your health, your performance in school and work can suffer. Exercising, eating a healthy diet and getting the right amount of sleep have been linked to better academic performance. Plus let’s face it… when you take care of yourself, you just feel better! If you feel tired, depressed or strung out, focus on eating healthy and getting some extra zzz’s. Maybe walk to work or class instead of driving to get some exercise in, and avoid things like alcohol and tobacco.

Talk to Your Friends

If these other tips aren’t enough, talk it out with some friends. Chances are some of them are going through the same thing and they might have some ideas to share. Plus, it helps to know you’re not alone.

Talk with a Trusted Instructor

When your friends’ ideas aren’t cutting it, it’s time to talk to a trusted instructor. They might have some tips you haven’t thought of yet. While your situation might be a little different, they probably know what you’re going through because they’ve seen it before. If they don’t have any suggestions, they might be able to work with you on alternative exam times or help you with your school work. Don’t expect a free pass, but they should be able to help you get everything done.

Reach Out to an Advisor

If the stress is just too much, your school should have someone on hand who specializes in helping students be successful. Carrington College offers students and their family members access to a Student Assistance Program called ASPIRE.  It’s a confidential service to help students with personal or school-related problems. No matter what, if things get to be too much you should reach out for help.

Juggling school and work is bound to be challenging, but with the right tools, you can set yourself up for success!

2 thoughts on “How to Handle the Stress of School and Work

  1. It depends on the campus you are interested in attending. Please contact Jamie Larson at jlarson@carrington.edu. She is our National Dean of Veterinary Programs and is happy to answer your question in greater detail.

  2. precious nancy

    hi, am really stressed into working and schooling. my work hours and classes are so tight that i cant leave one for another. i do evening classes which start at 4pm. at that hour is when work is dense. dont know what to do.

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